Turner & Jézéquel

5 March - 11 April 2014

Erskine, Hall & Coe is pleased to present an exhibition of new ceramics by Annie Turner paired with photography by Hervé Jézéquel.

Annie Turner is a British ceramic artist from Suffolk, whose art is very closely linked with the river Deben and its surrounding environment where she grew up.  Her sculptural ceramics are of hand-built stoneware that is often repeatedly fired. They appear rusted from having been fired once, twice and sometimes on more occasions, and their surfaces are thickened and coloured with oxides and slips.  Turner’s sculptures are delicate and fragile, yet possess a quality of strength that suggests movements of currents and the tides of the water, changing seasons and the passage of time.  

Her work communicates with the concepts of Hervé Jézéquel’s pictures. Jézéquel is a French photographer living in Paris, who explores ideas of ruined architecture and landscape in his work.  His photography is produced by using a 4 x 5 inch or 6 x 6 cm analogue camera with silver film. The black and white prints as well as the colour proofs are developed by himself or in a photographic laboratory under his control. The colour photographs are digital c-prints; the ‘Baramor’ series are inkjet prints on Canson Platine fibre rag 310g. The ’Skumenn’ series are inkjet prints on the same paper, but also mounted on dibon aluminium.  

All of Jézéquel's prints are limited editions. The ‘Skumenn’ and ‘Baramor’ photos are editions of eleven, and the colour series are editions of one. All of the photographs in this exhibition were taken in Brittany, France.  Jézéquel has travelled to many diverse areas such as Iceland, Spain, Greece, Italy and Turkey, and this exhibition will introduce his photography to the UK.

A theme addressed by both artists in this show is the idea of a 'borderline.'  Turner's work is concerned with exploring the edge of the river and its surrounding environment, while Jézéquel photographs along the edges of the sea. Littoral regions are imagined visually in the tide lines of some of Turner's 'River Ladders' and conceptually by the subjets she works to recreate in clay.  Similarly, Jézéquel has worked along the sea's coastline, having paid particular attention to the waves of the water and the small, often unnoticed details of the shore.

 

Please view images of Hervé Jézéquel's visit to Annie Turner's studio in Suffolk on the Exhibition Images page.